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20121229
20121229
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states with michael kazin. >> tonight i am going to us discuss abraham lincoln's role in the crisis of the union, 1860-61. more specifically will talk about however him again rejected any meaningful compromise. the country was gripped by a section of crisis because many southerners feared lincoln and his republican party. it was a north party and proudly so. it did not have a significant seven connection. lincoln was elected without a single lessor although for many of the 15 / states and only four of the border states did he get any popular votes and then nearly a handful. for the first time in the nation's history there will be taking over the executive branch of the national government. the republican party was proudly in northern party, during its brief existence in the mid 1850's damage its rhetoric and assault of the south, and the south major social institution racial slavery. and their determination that is the republicans' determination to well the north into a unit that could win a national election without any southern support, the republicans repeatedly condemned the sou
at large and michael duffy, executive editor for time magazine chronicle the relationship between the u.s. presidents in the president's club in side the world's most exclusive fraternity. political commentator kevin phillips recounts what he believes was the most important year of the american revolution which was 1775, a good year for revolutions. for an extended list of links to various publications, 2012 novel book selections visit the book tv website, booktv.org or our facebook page facebook.com/booktv . >> up next on book tv, richard wolff and david bersamian talk about our economic crisis and argue that it can be traced back to the 1970's when our economic system shifted from benefiting a vast majority of americans to one which mostly benefits only the very rich. this is about an hour-and-a-half. [applause] >> good to see you will hear. let's cut quickly to the chase. what is it and the dna of capitalism that makes this so unstable? >> since the beginning of economics as a discipline back in the days of adam smith and david mccarty who were the first to develop it as a comprehens
-book. >> michael grunwald's book "the new new deal" which is about the economic stimulus, i found it very interesting and not the kind of stuff we were reading, seeing people discuss on tv, he writes for time magazine and is sort of a non-partisan and an appreciation of what the stimulus not only did for the economy but what it means for the environment, sort of a story that got lost in all the politics in washington. >> we have to have you comment as an employee of usa today on u.s. aid tomorrow. >> and the day after. the newspaper in september was 30 years old so a bunch of reporters were sent out to talk to people who could predict what the world would be like 30 years from now which would be what are we talking about? 20, 40, 2042. >> we talked about what it means for their industry and we put out a little tab and now that tab, broadsheet is now an e-book which i think you can buy for the grand total of $1.99. it hasn't really taken off yet. the short form somewhere in between a book and magazine, there are a lot of good ones, amazon has been doing them, they posted almost immediately
we sent some of the documents and we just kept pressing our case. c-span: how much of this--michael korda has been here, who is the big editor at simon & schuster, and he was the guy that put together the book that ronald reagan wrote, or he didn't write it, but he told the story right here about how they would come to meetings, and ronald reagan didn't write it and other people wrote it for him. do you think that had something to do with impacting people that he wasn't much of a writer? >> guest: i think so. what martin has said before, and--and i think it's a--a good way of describing this book--this is the first book by ronald reagan. we know that in earlier books that his name was attached to, like his o--official biography and an earlier one, they were ghost-written or co-written. but this is really reagan's writing. so it was never intended for publication. it's a--but it ends up being a coherent body of work on policy issues in the late 1970s and some before and after. so it is unique. it is his first book. c-span: in the acknowledgments, you acknowledge three people i want t
with michael toner at center thurmond's office in the 80's and this is my husband. we are big fans of yours. >> i needed in my line of work. >> you are sweetheart. it's so nice to see you and i can't wait to read this. a. >> it's a good book. i will personalize it. >> we are getting one for his mom and dad. thank you, senator. it's great to see you. >> it will just tear their heart out. >> you are been changed a bit. >> travis jordan. it's been a couple of years. i was a -- scholar back in 2006. there we go. >> he is something else so i'm working for senator in see still and he has written a couple of letters of recommendation. i appreciate all your work. >> mike is a terrific guy. [inaudible] >> he still tells us that story. >> it's a true story. >> it's good seeing you. >> i will personalipersonali ze a. >> senator, hi how are you? i was press secretary on the house side when i got there in 1988. my boss though clinger, bill is doing great. i see him all the time and he gave me a list. he said if you want to know how i think, here's who you pay attention and yours was the first name on th
with michael founder. the senator back in the 80's. >> strom thurmond. >> this is my husband, greg. we are big fans of yours. >> i made it in my line of work. >> so nice to see you. >> really drill deeper. >> first one. [inaudible conversations] thank you, senator. great to see you. >> it will just tear their heart out. >> you have not changed a bit. [inaudible conversations] >> there you go. >> i know, right? >> working for senator ever mouth. [inaudible conversations] >> in politics. dougie then. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> the press secretary and the house side. give me -- >> you're doing great. >> he gave me a lift. you want to know how i think? here. pay attention. yours was the first name. the senate only had a couple of names on it. the chairman of the board. eight years. >> drive me out there. >> it was about six weeks ago. >> doing great. >> eight years was enough. [inaudible conversations] >> sometimes. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> i'm still here is your body guard, as your body g
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6